Energy Week Panels

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Health, Safety, and Environmental Concerns in Remote Drilling in Harsh Environments

With oil and gas exploration moving farther from established communities and infrastructure, there are an increasing number of challenges regarding day to day operation of drilling sites. Notably, the lack of infrastructure and supply chains present in offshore and undeveloped regions around the globe presents logistical difficulties to drillers and producers of oil and gas.  How can these geographically isolated sites be economically serviced and managed for day to day operations, infrastructure built for the export of produced fluids, and procedures developed for timely emergency safety response? Are current methods of infrastructure expansion sufficient or do new technologies need to be developed? One subtopic is the design of flare reduction methods in remote areas.

 

The Future of Nuclear Power

As a technology that often gets a bad reputation, the use of nuclear power within some countries is declining.  Given this, what does the future look like for nuclear, and will nations continue to move away from it as a power source? Questions that will be discusses in this panel include: What role does public perception play in the future of nuclear power, and how can it be changed? What types of reactors will we be using in the future: fusion, fission, molten salt, modular reactors or something else entirely? Can nuclear technology be made to handle natural and proliferation related dangers in an economically feasible manner? 

 

The Impact of Water Resources on Energy Technology

Water resources are closely connected to energy production and power generation. Both of these will be impacted in the future as droughts intensify. How will operators adapt to scarce water resources and improve their technologies to cope with this? 

 

Environmental & Economic Warfare: The Impact of Regulations on the Power Industry

In the U.S., coal and natural gas are the leading sources of electricity generation, and power plants are the single largest producers of carbon pollution.  To curb domestic greenhouse gas emissions, in June 2014 the EPA proposed the Clean Power Plan, which sets new guidelines aimed at cutting power industry CO2 emissions by 30% from the 2005 levels.   By reducing emissions to this level by 2030, the EPA projects that there will be a net climate and health benefit of $55-93 billion. The plan includes state-specific emissions reduction goals based on four types of changes in the energy sector: 1) increasing efficiency of coal plants, 2) more usage of existing natural gas facilities, 3) additional renewable generation, and 4) energy efficiency demand reduction.  The plan gives each state the flexibility to decide how it will influence these changes to meet the goal. 

This panel will address the economic, environmental, and social implications of the Clean Power Plan regulation on power generators.  Questions to be debated include: Will the plan change existing public and private approaches to climate protection?  How will the plan impact Texas generators versus the rest of the U.S.?  How deeply will the coal mining and coal power industries be affected?  What will the impact be on the renewable industry?  Will the plan affect downstream industries and electricity purchasers?  Is regulation the most efficient way to solve long-term climate change issues?

 

Fuels and Challenges Facing Alternative Energy

Natural gas prices are at an all time low in the U.S. while production is at an all time high, government subsidies are beginning to expire for solar and wind companies, and lifting the export ban is possibly on the horizon. What will happen if subsidies are allowed to expire? Are alternative energy producers self-sufficient? If not, why? Is Natural Gas creating a barrier to investment in alternative energy technologies? Or is natural gas helping the renewable energy industry by acting as a back-up fuel, when electricity generation from renewables for intermittent power generation? Can exports help level Natural Gas prices to become part of a diverse energy profile in the U.S.?

  

Energy Investments: the business decisions behind the future of energy

How do today’s companies choose tomorrow’s technologies, and how do they manage the risks?

This panel will involve a question and answer session with leaders of the Oil and Gas industry and pioneers in the Oilfield Services sector. The goal is to provide the audience with an opportunity to learn, question, and better understand the future of Oil and Gas production.

As a technology that often gets a bad reputation, the use of nuclear power within some countries is declining.  Given this, what does the future look like for nuclear, and will nations continue to move away from it as a power source? Questions that will be discusses in this panel include: What role does public perception play in the future of nuclear power, and how can it be changed? What types of reactors will we be using in the future: fusion, fission, molten salt, modular reactors or something else entirely? Can nuclear technology be made to handle natural and proliferation related dangers in an economically feasible manner? 

 

The Impact of Water Resources on Energy Technology

Water resources are closely connected to energy production and power generation. Both of these will be impacted in the future as droughts intensify. How will operators adapt to scarce water resources and improve their technologies to cope with this? 

  

Energy Investments: the business decisions behind the future of energy

How do today’s companies choose tomorrow’s technologies, and how do they manage the risks?

This panel will involve a question and answer session with leaders of the Oil and Gas industry and pioneers in the Oilfield Services sector. The goal is to provide the audience with an opportunity to learn, question, and better understand the future of Oil and Gas production. 

 

Frontiers of Drilling Technology

With the depletion of easily accessible oil and gas reservoirs, drilling has expanded into more remote and inhospitable areas. Specifically, expansion into ultra-deepwater and arctic regions introduces more technological challenges for drillers seeking to go farther offshore, deeper beneath the Earth’s surface, and into areas previously not contacted by humans. What new technologies make drilling in these areas possible and can be leveraged to ensure efficient and economical operations, and what must be done to keep development of these technologies cost effective? 

 

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